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3_Your_Pregnancy

Nausea • Pregnancy nausea is partially due to changing hormones, but is more common in women with a perfectionist, driven personality. • Poor eating prior to and in pregnancy may affect the degree of nausea a woman feels. • Nausea and aversion to certain foods in pregnancy is considered a protection mechanism, preventing one from eating possibly toxic foods. • Eating smaller meals more frequently and eating a little before rising in the morning is an old wives’ tale that really works. • Exchanging one meal a day for only fruit stems nausea in some. • Nausea, loss of appetite, aversion to certain foods and unpleasant tastes on the tongue or in the mouth are quite common in pregnancy. • Tongue-scraping or brushing often helps rid one’s mouth of unpleasant and metallic tastes. • Excessive nausea and vomiting, called “Hyperemesis Gravidarum”, must be treated to ensure that one doesn’t dehydrate, which can be serious for baby. • Deficiency of Vitamin B6 is associated with nausea, as is taking pregnancy supplements, in some. • Pregnancy nausea is frequently not only in the morning and many women experience it at other times or even for the whole day. • Nausea mostly begins after six weeks of pregnancy but can manifest later in the first trimester or hardly occur at all. • Digestive symptoms mostly improve or cease by about 12-14 weeks of pregnancy although some women experience them throughout the 40 weeks. • At times nausea may start later in pregnancy but then needs to be evaluated in terms of other possible factors, like blood pressure abnormalities, low blood sugar or anaemia. Fatigue • Fatigue in pregnancy is quite common and there are many possible causes. • Although pregnancy is not an illness, it is hard work - an expectant woman’s body is a 24 hour factory with only one person working all shifts! • Pregnancy is tiring and one should be guided by the body’s messages, taking occasional mini-breaks if necessary. • Generally, tiredness improves in the second trimester, once most of baby’s important developments are complete. • Pregnant women should avoid exceptionally high temperatures like in a sauna, steam baths, sun bed, hot water springs or long periods in very hot sun as baby may overheat in the womb in exceptional circumstances. • Go to bed no later than 22h00 and rise by 06h00, responding unhurriedly to body functions, to strengthen your energy resources.


3_Your_Pregnancy
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