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comlongon_history

was tested to the point where James thought he might lose succession to the English throne. He had been all but promised this and a pension from the English in 1586. Elizabeth demanded that Buccleuch should be handed over to the English for punishment. James was caught between allegiance to the Scots who were adamant Buccleuch had done no wrong in rescuing a man who was captured illegally and his desire to pander to his English benefactor, Elizabeth. Buccleuch was eventually 'warded' in England although no action was taken against him. In 1600 he attacked the village of Scotby with 140 riders, burning and taking prisoners and cattle. In 1602 he rode his last foray, south of Carlisle. He was still alive two years later, and his four sons who had helped to get him out of Carlisle Castle are frequently named in the later Border raids. Legend supposes he died in his bed of old age, sometime between 1608 and 1611. The story of the raid on Carlisle Castle is told in the ballad "Kinmont Willie" There was a continual state of bitter warfare in the area with families constantly switching sides and allegiances to take advantage of local power struggles. This volatile situation was made all the more uncertain by the ever present threat of English invasion from the south. The level of hatred, mistrust, violence and destruction through many generations in this area made any sort of stability almost impossible. Only those were had the strongest Border Towers and made astute connections had any chance of survival in a region often laid waste by both Scottish and English forces. For many generations the residence of the Murrays, of Cockpool, a family of great eminence in Annandale were wardens of the western border; and Cuthbert Murray, of Cockpool, was one of the commanders of the army which defeated the Duke of Albany and the Earl of Douglas, when they invaded Scotland in 1483. John Murray, a younger son of the family, having acquired a large estate, as well in Scotland as in England and Ireland, was created Earl of Annandale by James VI., and afterwards resided in the castle of Comlongan; but the family and title becoming extinct upon the death of his son without issue, in 1658, Lord Stormont succeeded to a considerable part of the property. His descendant, Viscount Stormont, in 1792 became second Earl of Mansfield; and from him the present earl, who is the principal landowner. Comlongon Castle 1500 8


comlongon_history
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