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also the historic pier and big views of Snowdonia. Rocky little Cable Bay is the ideal place for sea fishermen to cast a few lines. You can catch waves as well as fish, thanks to the big surfing swell from the south-west. There are more watersports at sandy Porth Nobla, with kayaking, fishing, sailing, swimming and scuba diving on the menu. Take in the view You’ll find buckets (and spades) of space on the long sandy span of dune-backed Porth Tywyn Mawr. There are some equally expansive views towards the bustling port of Holyhead and the Skerries out in the Irish Sea. Lleiniog’s sand and rockpools are augmented by impressive panoramas of Snowdonia and Llandudno’s Great Orme headland on the mainland. Head a short way from the beach and you can get a close look at atmospheric Aberlleiniog Castle. Live a wild life Head to Porth Eilian at Anglesey’s north-east tip for some serious nature spotting. You could catch a glimpse of birds like oystercatchers, choughs, ravens and gannets. Nearby Point Lynas is also a great place to see dolphins, porpoises and seals. The pebbly ridge of Cemlyn Bay protects a large saltwater lagoon, a nature reserve and important habitat for seabirds. And the winner is… We know our beaches are world-beaters, but you don’t have to take our word for it. Travel around our coast and you’ll find beautiful bays wherever you go. Our beaches attract a range of accolades, from Green Coast and Seaside Awards to prestigious Blue Flag Awards only handed out to the greenest and cleanest sandy superstars. For an up-to-date list of our award-winning beaches visit www.keepwalestidy.org. www.visitanglesey.co.uk www.discoveranglesey.com 13


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