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We’re at home with history. You’ll find reminders of thousands of years of heritage all over our island, from prehistoric sites and fabulous fortresses to working windmills and classic cars. architectural treasures – with treasure-filled interiors too, the epitome of country house living from a bygone age. For more on the house and its many features please see the ‘families’, ‘green’, ‘rainy days’, ‘explorers’ and ‘romantics’ sections of this guide. Bright spark Perched on its rocky islet amid the surging sea, South Stack Lighthouse is an Anglesey icon. Built to keep unwary ships from straying too close to a treacherous coastline, it’s been shining since 1809. It’s a striking sight when viewed from the mainland, but for the full experience you’ll need to cross the bridge and navigate a lung-busting 400 steps for a closer look. As you make the journey, spare a thought for the lighthouse’s builders. They had to make their way across in baskets, suspended by ropes above the crashing waves. Suddenly, the stairs don’t seem like such a bad option. The daily grind Feel the breeze at Llynnon Windmill at Llanddeusant on the north-west of the island. Anglesey’s combination of stiff sea winds and gentle rolling countryside with fertile soils meant that mills like this were once a common sight here in the ‘ breadbasket of Wales’. Today, Llynnon is the last working windmill in Wales. Its massive canvas sails and wooden gears still produce wholemeal flour, which can be sampled in cakes and bread from the mill’s Blas Llynnon tearoom. Holy water Reputedly founded by Anglesey’s own St Seiriol in the 6th century, Penmon Priory on the north-east of the island has been through some big changes in its long lifetime. Destroyed by Viking raiders in AD971, the atmospheric remains that stand today largely date from the 12th century. The oldest remnant is St Seiriol’s Well. Housed in a small stone building, this holy well has drawn pilgrims seeking its healing qualities since pre-Christian times. A tale of two bridges Explore the history of the Menai Suspension Bridge and the Britannia Bridge. See the exhibition at the Thomas Telford Centre in Menai Bridge to find out about how these links to mainland Wales were constructed. You can even use your new knowledge to have a go at building your own bridge, albeit on a slightly smaller scale.


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