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FOR EXPLORERS Lost in space Have an out-of-this world experience at Parys Mountain near Amlwch, where centuries of copper mining have transformed the land into a bizarre rust-coloured moonscape. Become a lunar explorer on a maze of trails that wind through the old mine site and investigate the remains of longabandoned buildings like the 19th-century beam house and the windmill once used to pump out the workings. You can continue your journey at the Copper Kingdom Centre in Amlwch Port. This award-winning heritage centre is packed with interactive exhibits that tell the story of the area’s copper mining history. Ghostly graves Test your nerve with a spooky trip inside Bryn Celli Ddu near Brynsiencyn. Built around 4,000 years ago, this Neolithic burial chamber is one of the oldest graves in Wales. Although its former inhabitants are long gone, you can still feel their presence in the tomb’s shadowy interior. If you want to add a little light to proceedings, time your visit for midsummer’s day when – thanks to some clever design from Bryn Celli Ddu’s ancient architects – the sun shines directly through the entrance. Locked up You’ll also feel the ghosts of the past at Beaumaris Gaol, reputedly one of the most haunted places on the island. This former prison has been preserved almost exactly as it was in its Victorian heyday, though now visitors are able to come and go as they please. Explore in the company of the disembodied voices of former inmates on a ghostly audio tour and see what life was like for the unfortunate inhabitants. Watch out for the treadmill (one of the last of its kind in Britain) where prisoners would be made to walk for hours pumping water around the building. Wonderwalls Predating the more famous fortress at Beaumaris by two centuries, Aberlleiniog Castle is one of Anglesey’s historical hidden gems. Nestled amid woodland overlooking the eastern mouth of the Menai Strait, the castle has a colourful past that includes Vikings, pirates and Norman invaders. It was originally built as a wooden motte and bailey (one of the earliest in Wales) by Robert of Rhuddlan, though what we see today are the stone remains of a later structure. 51


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