Page 65

Layout 1

FOR WILDLIFE If you go down to the woods today Wander the woodland of Dingle Local Nature Reserve near Llangefni for a colourful experience. The green leaves of sessile oak, ash and wild cherry trees are complemented by bright butterflies and wildflowers, including dazzling carpets of bluebells in spring. You might also be lucky enough to glimpse the red squirrels who call Dingle home. Driven from much of Britain by their aggressive grey cousins, these charismatic forest dwellers are staging a comeback on Anglesey. Thanks to recent conservation efforts, the island now boasts the largest red squirrel population in Wales (Newborough Forest, for example, is another good place to spot them). On the fens It’s the wetter the better at Cors Erddreiniog near Benllech. This marshy fenland, the largest on the island, has an orchid-rich vegetation found nowhere else in Britain other than a few sites on Anglesey and the Llyn Peninsula. Keep your eyes peeled and you might spot fly, fen and northern marsh orchids. In recognition of its exceptional flora, Cors Erddreiniog is designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), a Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and a RAMSAR wetland of international importance. Tern up Protected from the open sea by a natural barrier of shingle, the lagoon at Cemlyn Bay on the north coast is one of the most singular habitats in the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty that rings our coastline. Islands in the lagoon provide nesting spots for huge numbers of seabirds, including one of the largest breeding populations of rare sandwich terns in the UK. From the viewing point on the shingle ridge you can see the birds’ spectacular courtship displays at close range. If you’re visiting in spring, climb aboard a sea kayak and paddle out to the Skerries off Anglesey’s north-western tip. At this time of year, they’re home to thousands of breeding Arctic terns. If you’re lucky, you’ll witness the phenomenon known as ‘dreading’, when terns leave their nests in massive flocks and make huge squawking circles above the sea. 63


Layout 1
To see the actual publication please follow the link above