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Marvellous marshland Close to Llangefni, Malltraeth Marsh (another SSSI) covers 675 acres of reedbeds, marsh, wet grassland and small lakes. A popular spot with wintering wildfowl, its most interesting winged visitor is the bittern. This secretive bird’s booming call was once a commonplace sound on Anglesey. Now Malltraeth is at the heart of ongoing efforts to bring the bittern back, in the hope that those who currently spend the winter here can be encouraged to stay and breed. Should you fail to spot one, there are many other birds to look out for, including snipe, black-tailed godwit and at least four species of warbler. Make a reservation For a real showcase of our varied wild habitats, see the six North Wales Wildlife Trust Nature Reserves found across the island. With grass and heathland at Cors Goch, Caeau Pen y Clip, Mariandyrys and Porth Diana, limestone woodland at Coed Porthamel and the spectacular coastal spaces of Cemlyn, each reserve has its own unique atmosphere. Whether you’re looking for birds, blooms, bats or butterflies, you’re sure to find something to tickle your nature-loving tastebuds. Hop to it As the name suggests, you’ll probably see the odd rabbit at Newborough Warren National Nature Reserve, located at the western mouth of the Menai Strait. For centuries, their grazing on this huge dune system helped to maintain a diverse and species-rich habitat, until disease drastically reduced their numbers in the 1950s. The rabbits are now making a comeback, sharing grazing duties with free-roaming cattle and sturdy Welsh ponies. If you’re visiting in early July, look out for colourful carpets of marsh helleborines, one of our most beautiful wild orchid species. For more on our natural environment, head to the Visit Anglesey website. Or turn to pages 46–49 for an artistic view of our wonderful wildlife. www.visitanglesey.co.uk www.discoveranglesey.com 65


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