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Anglesey by numbers – it all adds up to an island full of things to see and do. With 143 scheduled monuments on an island measuring just 276 square miles, you’re always close to history here on Anglesey. Peer thousands of years into the past at our ancient and atmospheric burial chambers, standing stones and Celtic hillforts. Two for the price of one. You either crossed the 417m Menai Suspension Bridge on your way here (opened in 1826) or the more recent 461m Britannia Bridge. You’ll need to navigate 400 steps to reach stunning South Stack Lighthouse. The reward for your efforts? Out-of-this-world views of our craggy coastline, plus countless numbers of swooping seabirds. There are 58 letters in the name of tongue-twisting village Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogery chwyrn-drobwll-llan-tysilio-gogogoch. It’s the longest placename in Europe, but you can call it Llanfair PG for short. Lace up your boots for a walk on the 125-mile Anglesey Coast Path. You don’t have to tackle it all in one go – we’ve helpfully broken it down in to 12 bite-sized chunks for you in this guide. You’ll find 1,800 million years of history locked up in the rugged rocks of our coast and countryside. Anglesey’s geological rock stars are some of the oldest in the country. At their narrowest point, the waters of the Menai Strait separate Anglesey from the mainland by just 400m. It may be a short distance, but our little island still feels like a world apart. There are seven golf clubs spread across the island, offering a grand total of 99 holes just waiting to be played. Hope you remembered to bring your clubs. You’ll find delicious Halen Môn Anglesey Sea Salt on tables in more than 22 countries. Call in at the new £1.25 million Ty Halen Môn visitor centre, Brynsiencyn, for a taste of how it’s made. There are around 700 red squirrels living in parks, gardens and woodlands across the island, the largest single population anywhere in Wales. It may not be the biggest peak in the world, but 220m Holyhead Mountain is more than tall enough to provide some spectacular 360-degree views from its summit. More than 1,000 pairs of sandwich terns nest each summer on islands in Cemlyn Bay lagoon. That’s about 10 percent of the entire UK breeding population. Intrepid underwater explorers can find an estimated 1,200 shipwrecks in our coastal waters. Dive beneath the waves to investigate everything from 17th-century yachts to World War Two U-boats. www.visitanglesey.co.uk www.discoveranglesey.com 5


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