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the entrance to the harbour. Town’s long links with the sea are recalled at the Maritime Museum – but it has even deeper roots. Well-preserved Caer Gybi is a Roman fort, while St Cybi’s Church was founded in AD550. Beautiful walks in Penrhos Coastal Park and Breakwater Country Park, but for the most spectacular sea-cliff and seabird displays go to South Stack Lighthouse and Ellin’s Tower RSPB Centre, where rugged Holyhead Mountain meets the sea. Ucheldre, a leading arts centre, is a popular venue, along with the town’s leisure centre and pool. Llanfair PG Yes, you’ve all heard about it, but not possibly in the abbreviated version used by exhausted locals. So take a deep breath and test your dexterity with this, the UK’s (and the world’s?) longest placename: Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch, which means ‘St Mary’s (Church) by the white aspen over the whirlpool, and St Tysilio’s (Church) by the red cave.’ Afterwards, you’ll deserve s bit of R&R, so go shopping at James Pringle Weavers (one of the biggest craft retail complexes in North Wales), visit the National Trust’s magnificent Plas Newydd and – if you have the energy – climb the Marquess of Anglesey Column for sensational views of the island and Snowdonia. Llangefni County town and administrative centre suitably located smack in the middle of Anglesey. It’s a busy crossroads destination with a good range of shops. Open-air markets on Thursdays and Saturdays are popular. It’s culturally busy too – the superb Oriel Ynys Môn museum and gallery sums up the essential qualities of the island with displays of art, wildlife, history and heritage, while Theatre Fach is an intimate venue for various productions. Swimming at the leisure centre, golf at a nine-hole course, walks and wildlife at the Dingle Nature Reserve and Llyn Cefni Reservoir. Menai Bridge They don’t build them like that anymore. Thomas Telford’s Menai Suspension Bridge is a magnificent sight. This harmonious, elegant structure looks as if it has been part of the scenery forever (actually, it was built in 1820s for the London to Holyhead route). The world’s first iron suspension bridge takes you directly to the eponymous little town prettily located alongside. Place to visit include a well-known, long-established art gallery and Pili Palas Nature World, a popular family attraction. Walk along the shore for close-up views of the remarkable bridge (you’ll also catch sight of the more modern Britannia Bridge) and Church Island, linked by causeway. The town also has a leisure centre. Moelfre Attractive coastal village close to two fine beaches, Traeth Bychan and Traeth Lligwy. Anglesey’s rocky east coast has claimed many ships – a monument recalls the wrecking of the Royal Charter in 1859 with the loss of over 400. Moelfre’s Lifeboat Station is still active and the small Seawatch Centre contains lifeboat, shipwreck and maritime heritage displays. There’s heritage on dry land too, in the shape of some of the island’s most fascinating ancient sites – Lligwy Burial Chamber, Din Lligwy Hut Group and Capel Lligwy. Newborough The ‘new borough’ established by English King Edward I is quite unlike the rest of Anglesey. Beyond the village lies a strange mix of dune, sand, saltmarsh and conifer


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