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Parenting Matters Spring 17 HIGH RES

You may feel ready to introduce a bedtime routine when your baby is around three months old. Getting them into a simple, soothing bedtime routine can be helpful for everyone and help prevent sleeping problems later on. It is also a great opportunity to have one-to-one time with your baby. The routine could consist of: • having a bath • changing into night clothes and a fresh nappy • brushing their teeth (if they have any) • putting them to bed • reading a bedtime story • dimming the lights in the room to create a calming atmosphere • singing a lullaby or having a wind-up musical mobile you can turn on when you have put your baby to bed Whilst they are at nursery all children are given the opportunity to rest, relax or have quiet time through the provision of comfortable areas both indoors and out. These are normally our book areas with soft furnishings and a variety of books and storytelling resources to enjoy. We ensure that individual sleep routines are followed after discussion with parents initially during Settling in Visits. The Key Person prepares children for sleep by moving to a quiet area of the room, offering a bed, reading stories or gently singing nursery rhymes or just being nearby whilst they naturally fall asleep. There is a wealth of guidance for parents to support them in the role of keeping children safe and preventing accidents, this is especially true for sleeping babies. Always place your baby on their back to sleep, with their feet at the foot of the cot. Place your baby to sleep in a separate cot or Moses basket in the same room as you for the first 6 months, even during the day. Keep your baby smoke free during pregnancy and after birth. Use a firm, flat, waterproof mattress that is clean and in good condition, or a baby sleep bag of the correct size for the weight of your baby. Never sleep on a sofa or in an armchair with your baby. Do not cover your baby’s face or head while sleeping or use loose bedding, cot bumpers for under 1’s should not be used. Do not sleep in the same bed as your baby if you smoke, drink, take drugs or if your baby was born prematurely or was of low birth weight. Avoid letting your baby get too hot, a room temperature between 16 – 20C is ideal and ensure they are not overdressed. Children should not be left to sleep in car seats. For more information visit: www.lullabytrust.org.uk Kathleen Lake, BA (Hons.) Head of Early Years Practice, Brinkley Lane Nursery


Parenting Matters Spring 17 HIGH RES
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