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Review February 2017.indd

REVIEWS Entertainment book reviews R e v ie w s 2016 was another fantastic year for Scottish crime fi ction, starting in January with Stuart McBride’s 10th outing for Logan ‘Laz’ MacRae, In The Cold Dark Ground. When it came to non-fi ction, Jennifer Morag Henderson’s biography Josephine Tey: A Life was fascinating. Lesley Kelly’s debut, A Fine House In Trinity, did well, making it on to the long list for the McIlvanney Prize. Bad Samaritan by Michael Malone was a shocking resolution to a fantastic series, while A Rising Man by Abir Mukherjee, set in 1919 Calcutta, was set in a refreshing time and place, in the historical crime section. Kill Me Twice, by ex-journalist Anna Smith was the fi rst I’d read of her Rosie Gilmour series, and its gritty realism, ensured it won’t be the last. I adored Beloved Poison and can’t wait to see what the talented E.S.Thomson does next with her characters Jem and Will. As ever, the wonderful Catriona McPherson didn’t disappoint with The Child Garden, the tale of a seemingly idyllic school for children that closed after a death 30 years earlier, only for someone to be now picking off the surviving pupils. If you’re thinking of heading to Orkney this year and considering fl ying, Crash Land by Doug Johnstone will certainly have you thinking twice about that decision! Summoning The Dead by Tony Black told the heartbreaking story of an investigation into a double child murder which had been undiscovered for 30 years, near an old boys’ home. Craig Robertson showed he gets better and better with every book in his Winter & Narey series with the fantastically chilling Murderabilia, about those who collect memorabilia from murderers. Ian Rankin fol- Black Widow by Chris Brookmyre lowed up 2015’s return to form with the even better Rather Be The Devil – miss it at your peril, and savour it, as next year will see nothing new from him as he celebrates 30 Years Of Rebus. As for my favourite book of the year, I really couldn’t split these two apart, so in joint fi rst position for crimeworm’s Book(s) Of The Year 2016 are Chris Brookmyre with Black Widow (also winner of the McIlvanney Prize for Best Scottish Crime Novel) and Graeme Macrae Burnet’s His Bloody Project, which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. But really, any of the titles mentioned will keep you reading late into the evening on these cold winter nights! Crimeworm lives in Oban, and spends much of her time solving crime and travelling vicariously through her large collection of crime fi ction. More reviews can be found at crimeworm.wordpress.com. 44 | FEBRUARY 2017


Review February 2017.indd
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